Category Archives: renal diet

Renal Failure Meal Planning

Renal Failure Meal Planning

Renal Failure Meal PlanningMost people make renal failure meal planning much more difficult than it needs to be. It’s true; there are restrictions to your diet that may make meal planning a little more challenging. However, these restrictions also make it a little more adventurous. It gives you license to try new things. You may discover new favorite dishes that you can prepare extras to freeze and reheat on days when you just don’t feel like cooking, run out of time to prepare an extravagant meal, or have unexpected guests for dinner. These renal failure meal planning ideas will help you stay on top of your game and your diet even when the going gets a little rough.

Try Something New

There are a ton of recipe books, websites, and pages devoted to assisting with renal failure meal planning. They include recipes of popular comfort food makeovers just right for renal failure dietary needs. There are also great deserts, casseroles, and other dishes you can try — even popular holiday dishes. Save a little room in your renal failure meal planning to try at least one new recipe each week and see how it goes.

Plan Ahead to Prepare Ahead

Freezer cooking was all the rage back in the eighties and nineties. It’s making a bit of a comeback in the 2010’s with people looking for new ways to cut costs, have family meals around an actual table, and make life easier. The concept is that you prepare two dishes for everyone making one for now and freezing the other for later. When you find good dishes that are renal diet friendly, you need to make the most of your time in the kitchen. This is a great way to do just that.

Pull Double Duty

Part of renal failure meal planning is preparing the grocery list. If you create your grocery list at the same time as you plan your menu for the week you are less likely to leave important things off your list and less likely to stray from your list in the story. Straying from your list can lead to purchasing items that are not renal diet friendly at all. Instead, make both lists at the same time and know what you need the minute you walk in the doors of your local supermarket.

Don’t Forget a Few Convenience Foods

There are a few food items that are renal failure friendly that are also convenient for snacks and light meals. Make sure you stock up on a few of these just to have around the house. These are important parts of renal failure meal planning that will help satisfy unexpected cravings, provide fast access to favorite foods when you don’t feel like preparing an entire meal, and can even provide a quick pick-me-up for your guests.

Don’t get sidetracked in your renal failure meal planning efforts. It’s important to take the time to plan a menu that’s packed with good foods for your dietary needs without missing out on the comfort foods that make you feel happy and warm inside.

If you want to find a trusted source for meal planning and diet information you might try this blog listed below

Renal Diet Blog of A Renal Dietitian, Follow This Link

Mathea Ford is also a great author and has some great books, see here!

Renal Diet Beverages and How to Make it Work

renal diet beveragesOne of the most difficult things for many people in renal failure or on dialysis must contend with is the need to diligently control their fluid intake. Renal diet beverages must be diligently monitored. Not simply beverages either. This includes foods that are likely to become fluids at room temperature.

How Much is Too Much When it comes to Renal Diet Beverages?

The exact amount will vary from person to person according to other medications you may be taking or conditions you may have. A good rule of thumb, however, is the concept of “urine plus 500 ml.” Those who urinate frequently are able to drink more. Most people on dialysis, though, urinate very little. The 500 ml amount covers the amount of fluids most people lose through their skin and lungs on an average day.

Controlling Renal Diet Beverages

It’s not always easy to control the renal diet beverages you consume on a daily basis. We live in an “on demand” society where we’re accustomed to drinking water (or other beverages) when we’re thirsty. The problem is that 500 ml of liquid is about four cups of fluids in an entire day. It takes a little getting used to.

These are a few steps you can take to limit your daily fluid intake from renal diet beverages:

1)      Create a routine that includes one glass of liquid at specific times throughout the day. This helps you keep track of your fluid intake rations your fluids throughout the day so you aren’t left feeling thirsty all night.

2)      Use proportioned servings.

3)      Don’t drink with meals. This way you’re less likely to linger and “over-drink” after meals.

4)      Time your daily medications to coincide with your scheduled beverages. This way you’re not sneaking in additional beverages that will do more harm for you than good.

In addition to limiting your daily liquid intake, you must also pay attention to the specific beverages you consume. Some beverages, even those that are healthy for the general public, are not good renal diet beverages because they contain sodium, phosphates, and other ingredients that are potentially harmful.

 

Harmful Renal Diet Beverages

  • Orange juice
  • Tomato juice
  • Prune juice
  • Milk
  • Dark colored sodas

The juices and milk must be carefully controlled because they contain a large amount of potassium. Darker sodas contain a fair amount of phosphorus. All of these can spell bad news for anyone dealing with renal failure, kidney disease, or dialysis.

Knowing that it’s bad to overindulge in renal diet beverages is one thing. Understanding why it’s so necessary, though, can help you remain on the straight and narrow. Since your body is no longer eliminating excess fluid naturally, the fluid remains in your body longer. This means it can build up in your heart and lungs causing catastrophic health consequences.

Follow your doctor’s orders when it comes to dietary restrictions and stay on the straight and narrow with your renal diet beverages to increase the likelihood of a longer road ahead of you.

Renal Diet Headquarters-Best of Show Click Here

The Basics of a Renal Disease Diet

The Basics of a Renal Disease Diet

renal disease dietWhen you have chronic kidney disease, you need to have a renal disease diet plan because what you eat affects your health. The type of foods in your renal disease diet that you will be able to eat will become limited, since you need to control the minerals that you take in order to avoid the complications associated with renal disease. In addition, you need to limit the sodium and fluid that you take so as not to cause fluid buildup in the body. If you want to know the foods that you can and cannot eat in a renal disease diet, check out this basic guide.

Protein-renal disease diet

One of the nutrients that will be affected by a renal disease diet would be proteins. Proteins are essential in building and repairing body tissues so that your body will easily heal and stay healthy. However, too much protein in a renal disease diet would be tiresome to your kidneys, since the metabolism of protein creates urea as a side product, which is a body waste that is usually excreted by the kidneys. But with the kidneys no longer functioning as it used to be, there might be problems with urea buildup. Therefore, a renal disease diet should have foods that are low in protein, such as fresh beans, grains, fruits, and vegetables. You should avoid high protein foods such as meat, poultry, eggs, and milk products in your renal disease diet.

Phosphorus-renal disease diet

Phosphorus is important for building and maintaining your teeth and bones, as well as maintaining nerve and muscle function. But when you have a renal disease, you might also have problems in maintaining the balance of phosphorus and calcium in your body. To make sure that there is a balance between these two minerals, you need to lower your phosphorus intake in your renal disease diet. Avoid high phosphorus foods like cola, ice cream, beer, chicken, nuts, cheese, and sardines. Instead, substitute them with low phosphorus foods in your renal disease diet, such as non-cola soda, sherbet, zucchini squash, and hard candy.

Potassium-renal disease diet

Potassium is an essential mineral for the heart, since it keeps your heart working properly. If you have too much potassium in your body, it can lead to irregular heartbeats or even stop your heartbeats without warning. Limit your potassium intake by removing the following foods from your renal disease diet: bananas, broccoli, oranges, mushroom, potatoes, mustard, apricots, coffee, and chocolate. You can substitute them with beans, apples, watermelon, grapes, cucumber, cherries, carrots, bread, and rice in your renal disease diet.

Sodium-renal disease diet

When you have a renal disease, your kidneys will have difficulty removing excess sodium in your body. This will lead to sodium and fluid retention in your body, thus manifesting as swelling in different parts of the body. High sodium foods that should be eliminated from a renal disease diet include table salt, potato chips, cold cuts, bacon, canned goods and vegetables, processed diner mixes, nuts, and cheese. Look for foods that are labeled as salt free, sodium free, reduced sodium, unsalted, and lightly salted.

A renal disease diet can be very restrictive and hard to follow. However, planning it and trying to religiously follow it is a great start towards maintaining your health despite your renal disease.

For more information on renal disease diets visit this site and blog for great information

Mom's Meals

Review of Renal Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

Review of Renal Diabetic Diet Meal Planner

Renal_Diabetic_Meal_Plans_Menus_MoreIn searching for my latest review of a renal diet solution, I located the site of Renal Diet HQ and noticed that they offered a renal diabetic diet meal plan as a membership option.  So, in looking at a product to review I thought it would be nice to take an in-depth look at one of the only renal diabetic diet meal plans on the market to see what it offered and see if it stacks up to what I think any meal plan solution should.

First, let’s discuss what I  think any good meal planning or diet solution should offer.  At a minimum it should offer an overall plan that is priced based on the options and benefits is offers and it should be offered with some customer support if you should run into a problem with the download or receiving the information that you ordered.

Now, let’s discuss what this renal diabetic meal plan from Renal Diet HQ offers in its sales pitch.  This plan says that it is curated by a registered dietitian in the USA with experience in renal and diabetic patients.  This is a good start. It also says that it has the following with the plan: Meal patterns for breakfast, lunch and dinner, a snack list and recipes and grocery lists for dinner meals with every day being a new one.  Wow, that is a lot of information and a lot of new recipes over the course of a month or year.  The price for this monthly membership service is about $20 per month.  So, I wanted to try this out for myself to see what the download looked like and if the plan has all that.  I filled out the registration form and submitted my payment and I surprised to find all the files as promised and a few others like a renal diet potassium list and a phosphorus list as well.  These were nice added touches to the monthly plan.  On the first week I received two weeks of plans and each following week I received the dinner meals and grocery lists for that said week.  Each recipe has all the nutritionals needed for a renal diabetic diet.  Some have more carbs than others and some have more potassium and protein than others but the good thing is that you can pick and choose which meals fit your restrictions.  Some folks have higher sodium restrictions than others and some do not.  It makes it were you know what you are doing and can tailor it to your needs.  Also, the variety seems to follow a beef, chicken, turkey, fish and vegetarian meal every week.  Lot’s of choices.  The other thing is the meal portions can be used for other meals if you do not have a large family or if you do not eat all the meal.  Save it for lunch the next day or dinner tomorrow. I found almost all the meals I made to be very tasty and I am pretty picky.

4.1.1I found that the base limitations for the renal diabetic plan from Renal Diet HQ does appear to be with in the standards for nationally recognized limits in the US.  As with all dieting and medical concerns your limits may vary a bit from these standards based on your doctors orders.  Please always consult with your physician as to what you are doing and decisions you make.

If you have diabetes and pre-dialysis kidney disease then this plan might be right for you.  I think that the price is correct for all the information I have gotten and I have not located a more comprehensive plan as of yet.  Oh, also, this is plan is done by Mathea Ford RD/LD and she does offer a one time 8 week plan that is not a monthly membership.  So, if you are apprehensive about joining the monthly plan you might try the one time purchase, it is at the time of writing $47.

Find the link here for Renal Diet HQ –Renal Diabetic Diet Meal Planner

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Renal Diet Reviews-A Synopsis Of A Great Meal Planner!

Renal Diet Reviews

renal diet

Predialysis Diet Meal Plan

This particular post is not about one single product it is more of a list or renal diet review of what a renal diet for predialysis should include.  I have found after reviewing several predialysis diet meal plan that each plan has certain things and attributes that all predialysis patients need to have or avoid.    The only one that completely covers all the areas and gets 5 stars from me is Renal Diet HQ.

Renal Diet

The areas of renal diets that I feel are needed are the following: plan of some sort for the day and week, breakfast, lunch and dinner plans/patterns, meal recipes with side dishes and then some type of grocery list or way to get to a list.  It is considered a bonus to get educational materials and gets and extra star if lists of foods for each diet are also provided.  Each plan I review or try has to able to be printed easy and can not be difficult to read.  Price ranges are from $20 to $125 per month, I found that my 5 star plan is only $19.97 per month probably because they have several hundred thousand members and it keeps the cost down.  The Secrets plan is purchased one time but it is unclear what you really get so many are very hesitant to buy the plan even though it gets 3 stars from me.
When selecting a plan in the United States look for a reputable site and some one in the US who is licensed or has some credentials if some sort that are regulated.  If you find some thing offshore please be very cautious about who you give your information to.

For my 5 star predialysis diet meal plan click through here!

Predialysis Diet Meal Planner

predialysis dietKidney Dieters Need to Follow a Meal Planner That Consists of The Appropriate Diet for Their Condition-Predialysis Diet

Not all renal diets are the same! The diets are pre-dialysis, renal diabetic and dialysis.  Each of these conditions has its own set of limitations and expectations.  I often find that people just search for renal diet thinking that they are getting the right thing for them and they have no idea it does not match what they really need.  I find that most patients at this stage of the search are in pre-dialysis and have not been educated by their doctor or physician on what to do about the condition and nutrition.  Most dialysis patients have received education over the years and have a sense of what is going on with their condition.  A predialysis diet is needed along with education on what will make the patient feel better.

Predialysis Diet

Currently a diet meal plan for predialysis does exist written by Mathea Ford.  Her Renal Diet HQ site also offers an IQ series for predialysis that is formatted into modules that number 1-12!  The meal plans have patterns and recipes along with grocery lists.  Each predialysis diet has low and high potassium an phosphorus lists.  Each IQ series module is formatted for reading in terms that can be understood by just about any patient.  The topics are many and include eating out and lab terminology just to name a few.  A predialysis diet is a good starting point for any patient.

If you think a predialysis diet meal plan would be a good fit for you then please give Mathea’s plan a shot!

It will make you feel better and possibly avoid dialysis!  That is what we want, right?

Create Your Own Kidney Diet Plan – Build A Meal Pattern For Stage 3 or 4 Kidney Disease

Create Your Own Kidney Diet Plan – Build A Meal Pattern For Stage 3 or 4 Kidney Disease is authored by Mathea Ford RD/LD.

This book allows you the ability to download an excel worksheet from Mathea’s website and use it to calculate your own predialysis meal plan based on the foods you like and the limitations you have been given by your doctor.  The book has extensive information on predialysis diets and foods but does not include recipes but it does not claim to have recipes.  Mathea did author a recipe book but we will get to that in a later review.

B009PSN3R0A short review of kidney disease is included along with information on high blood pressure and how is affects kidney functions.  Also included is education on reading nutrition labels, reducing sodium in your diet and also ways to reduce protein intake.  I also found that the sections of the book on potassium and phosphorus were very helpful to me in planning my grocery list each week and also in educating me on the ways these items affect kidney function.  The potassium section does have a discussion on leaching of veggies, which I liked as well.

At the end of the book there is a bit of information on heart disease and reducing fat intakes in your diet.  We all sure could use that!  I found that eating out with renal failure was a challenge and found that the chapter on eating out with renal disease was a great starter for me and my family.

Create Your Own Kidney Diet Plan:

You can tell, is a top seller and is a great resource for any pre-dialysis renal disease sufferer.  The price tag is in the $20 range and I have found this is comparable for all the books in the kidney disease category whether it be general information, cures or diet and nutrition.

What we all need to remember is that kidney disease is a serious complication and that taking advice from someone on the internet in another country can be dangerous.  This author is in the United States and is a Registered Dietitian.  In addition, from all I can find she is very well qualified and has complete meal planning services on her website, which is mentioned in the book.

Shown here are both the Kindle Version and the Print Version both available on the Amazon website.

My recommendation would be to try this book out and give the spreadsheet and the calculations a shot, follow it for a few months and see how your numbers improve and see if you feel better.  If you do then you know this book and plan are for you.  Tell your doctor all that you are doing and tell him or her if this book has lead you in the right direction.

The Kidney Friendly Diet Cookbook: Recipes For A PreDialysis Kidney Disease Lifestyle

The Kidney Friendly Diet Cookbook: Recipes For A Pre-Dialysis Kidney Disease Lifestyle

Welcome, to my first review of a cookbook for renal diets.   This particular cookbook is specifically targeted at predialysis kidney disease patients and should be followed accordingly.  The book is easy to read and is color coded by type of food.  The large print format is very readable for eyes that are not so good. The author does provide some color photos of the foods but not every recipes has a photo, I do not find that to be a very big deal, at least for me.

The_Kidney_Friendly__Cover_for_Kindle(1)

 Qualified For Renal Diets

The one thing that I can say after all my research is the the author appears to be very qualified and has a website on renal diets.  As a registered dietitian, she seems to have experience with renal disease patients and also diabetes patients and many times these two conditions run together.

Now, let’s get to the recipes.  As I have prepared several of the recipes they are very easy to understand and prepare. I do like that all the nutritionals are available for every recipe and that this allows each particular user the option to pick and choose the recipes that are right for them.  Potassium and phosphorus are clearly stated as well as all the other essential nutritionals as per the normal guidelines for renal diets.

I find that cookbooks in this category a bit higher priced than certain other categories but the information is much more detailed and well worth the price.  Many predialysis patients would spend many tireless hours searching for this many recipes so, I say it is well worth the money.

Please find the cookbook for renal diets here if you wish to give it a try, I think you will like it.