Category Archives: Renal Diabetic Diet

Renal Diabetes Food List

Renal Diabetes Food List

Renal Diabetes Food ListWhen you’re on a special diet for renal failure, food list ideas don’t always work out for the people who need them most. They’re either too cumbersome to carry around at all times, too obtrusive to keep up with all the time, or simply too embarrassing for many people to pull out whenever it becomes necessary. These renal diet food list ideas, though, will help you keep the lists in a centralized location in your home or carry them discretely with you — wherever you may go.

Consult a Nutritionist to Create a Renal Diabetes Food List You can Live With

Getting started is the hardest part for most people. Renal diabetes patients often spend a great deal of time focused on the things they can no longer fail and forget to explore the depths of the foods they can have instead.

Nutritionists are great for helping you see the possibilities instead of the limitations. That’s important as you begin creating a renal diabetes food list that will help you establish healthy eating routines to carry you into the future. The sooner in the process you make an appointment with a qualified nutritionist; the faster you’ll begin to feel better about your menu and food choice options.

Print out Full List and Post in Prominent Place

The refrigerator is an excellent place to keep your renal diabetes food list. This way it’s handy whenever you’re making your grocery list, planning your weekly menu, or going for an afternoon snack. There are all kinds of cute magnetic refrigerator frames you can use to make it look neat and tidy, while keeping it handy for regular use.

Print a Smaller Copy of the List for Portability

While most meals, snacks, and shopping lists are enjoyed or created at home, there are times when you’re out and about when the time for meals comes along. Sometimes you simply leave your grocery list at home. These are the times when you need something handy with you to help you make wise decisions. A small renal diabetes food list in your pocket or purse can help you do just that.

There’s an App for That-Renal Diabetes Food List

If you own a smart phone, another option is to install an app that helps you keep up with what’s a hit and miss for your renal diet needs. Consult with your physician to see if he or she can recommend a good app to help you stay on target with your renal diabetes food list whether you’re at home or on the go.

Your renal diabetes food list needs to be packed with food choices and meal plans you’ll be happy to eat that will leave you feeling satisfied and not deprived. Try to incorporate meal plans that can be easily prepared ahead of time to help you avoid making convenience choices that aren’t exactly wise for your health needs. Freezer cooking and slow cooker (crock-pot) meals are also great ideas if you still lead an active life.

Get Your Free Potassium and Phosphorus FOOD List Here, It is Simple

Renal Failure Meal Planning

Renal Failure Meal Planning

Renal Failure Meal PlanningMost people make renal failure meal planning much more difficult than it needs to be. It’s true; there are restrictions to your diet that may make meal planning a little more challenging. However, these restrictions also make it a little more adventurous. It gives you license to try new things. You may discover new favorite dishes that you can prepare extras to freeze and reheat on days when you just don’t feel like cooking, run out of time to prepare an extravagant meal, or have unexpected guests for dinner. These renal failure meal planning ideas will help you stay on top of your game and your diet even when the going gets a little rough.

Try Something New

There are a ton of recipe books, websites, and pages devoted to assisting with renal failure meal planning. They include recipes of popular comfort food makeovers just right for renal failure dietary needs. There are also great deserts, casseroles, and other dishes you can try — even popular holiday dishes. Save a little room in your renal failure meal planning to try at least one new recipe each week and see how it goes.

Plan Ahead to Prepare Ahead

Freezer cooking was all the rage back in the eighties and nineties. It’s making a bit of a comeback in the 2010’s with people looking for new ways to cut costs, have family meals around an actual table, and make life easier. The concept is that you prepare two dishes for everyone making one for now and freezing the other for later. When you find good dishes that are renal diet friendly, you need to make the most of your time in the kitchen. This is a great way to do just that.

Pull Double Duty

Part of renal failure meal planning is preparing the grocery list. If you create your grocery list at the same time as you plan your menu for the week you are less likely to leave important things off your list and less likely to stray from your list in the story. Straying from your list can lead to purchasing items that are not renal diet friendly at all. Instead, make both lists at the same time and know what you need the minute you walk in the doors of your local supermarket.

Don’t Forget a Few Convenience Foods

There are a few food items that are renal failure friendly that are also convenient for snacks and light meals. Make sure you stock up on a few of these just to have around the house. These are important parts of renal failure meal planning that will help satisfy unexpected cravings, provide fast access to favorite foods when you don’t feel like preparing an entire meal, and can even provide a quick pick-me-up for your guests.

Don’t get sidetracked in your renal failure meal planning efforts. It’s important to take the time to plan a menu that’s packed with good foods for your dietary needs without missing out on the comfort foods that make you feel happy and warm inside.

If you want to find a trusted source for meal planning and diet information you might try this blog listed below

Renal Diet Blog of A Renal Dietitian, Follow This Link

Mathea Ford is also a great author and has some great books, see here!

The Basics of a Renal Disease Diet

The Basics of a Renal Disease Diet

renal disease dietWhen you have chronic kidney disease, you need to have a renal disease diet plan because what you eat affects your health. The type of foods in your renal disease diet that you will be able to eat will become limited, since you need to control the minerals that you take in order to avoid the complications associated with renal disease. In addition, you need to limit the sodium and fluid that you take so as not to cause fluid buildup in the body. If you want to know the foods that you can and cannot eat in a renal disease diet, check out this basic guide.

Protein-renal disease diet

One of the nutrients that will be affected by a renal disease diet would be proteins. Proteins are essential in building and repairing body tissues so that your body will easily heal and stay healthy. However, too much protein in a renal disease diet would be tiresome to your kidneys, since the metabolism of protein creates urea as a side product, which is a body waste that is usually excreted by the kidneys. But with the kidneys no longer functioning as it used to be, there might be problems with urea buildup. Therefore, a renal disease diet should have foods that are low in protein, such as fresh beans, grains, fruits, and vegetables. You should avoid high protein foods such as meat, poultry, eggs, and milk products in your renal disease diet.

Phosphorus-renal disease diet

Phosphorus is important for building and maintaining your teeth and bones, as well as maintaining nerve and muscle function. But when you have a renal disease, you might also have problems in maintaining the balance of phosphorus and calcium in your body. To make sure that there is a balance between these two minerals, you need to lower your phosphorus intake in your renal disease diet. Avoid high phosphorus foods like cola, ice cream, beer, chicken, nuts, cheese, and sardines. Instead, substitute them with low phosphorus foods in your renal disease diet, such as non-cola soda, sherbet, zucchini squash, and hard candy.

Potassium-renal disease diet

Potassium is an essential mineral for the heart, since it keeps your heart working properly. If you have too much potassium in your body, it can lead to irregular heartbeats or even stop your heartbeats without warning. Limit your potassium intake by removing the following foods from your renal disease diet: bananas, broccoli, oranges, mushroom, potatoes, mustard, apricots, coffee, and chocolate. You can substitute them with beans, apples, watermelon, grapes, cucumber, cherries, carrots, bread, and rice in your renal disease diet.

Sodium-renal disease diet

When you have a renal disease, your kidneys will have difficulty removing excess sodium in your body. This will lead to sodium and fluid retention in your body, thus manifesting as swelling in different parts of the body. High sodium foods that should be eliminated from a renal disease diet include table salt, potato chips, cold cuts, bacon, canned goods and vegetables, processed diner mixes, nuts, and cheese. Look for foods that are labeled as salt free, sodium free, reduced sodium, unsalted, and lightly salted.

A renal disease diet can be very restrictive and hard to follow. However, planning it and trying to religiously follow it is a great start towards maintaining your health despite your renal disease.

For more information on renal disease diets visit this site and blog for great information

Mom's Meals

Kidney Disease Solution

Eating A Pre-Dialysis Kidney Diet – Sodium, Potassium, Phosphorus and Fluids: A Kidney Disease Solution (Renal Diet HQ IQ Pre Dialysis Living) (Volume 2)

kidney disease solution

My review of the second book in the series by Mathea Ford, A Kidney Disease Solution.  This particular volume is a little bit shorter page wise but is just as good on the ability of the author to present the best information on kidney disease diets you can ever imagine.  Now, I am no doctor but what I look for is ease of reading and practical information that I can apply to busy daily lifestyle with predialysis kidney disease.

A Kidney Disease Solution

The best of the books so far and only because these four topics are very important to all pre dialysis kidney disease and renal diabetic sufferers.  A kidney disease solution has in it included information on sodium, potassium, phosphorus and fluids.  These are all very important to me and kidney disease diets.

A Kidney Disease Solution by Mathea Ford RD/LD-Sodium

One of the most important items with sodium and kidney disease is the need to reduce blood pressure due to high sodium.  I like this read because Mathea give great tips on reducing sodium in your diet and offers a recipe for salt free bread.

A Kidney Disease Solution by Mathea Ford RD/LD-Potassium

One of the best ways to reduce potassium is to leach the potassium out of your vegetables.  The author does a great job of explaining the best practices in leaching.  Also, basic reasons for reducing potassium and the best thing I found in this book is a link to download a full list of high and low potassium foods, what a great resource!  And a bonus I was not expecting and the download was very easy to perform.

 A Kidney Disease Solution by Mathea Ford RD/LD-Phosphorus

A phosphorus list is also included in the downloaded list along with the potassium.  I really think Mathea is at the forefront of pre-dialysis information on dieting.  She is really about moderation, management and control.  She does not always say that everyone should eliminate everything because everyone is different.  I really have come to believe her on this.

A great chapter on white and wheat bread is an added section that I will definitely use the information for.

I believe that this series of books would be great for anyone who needs to read and educate themselves on a kidney disease solution.

Secrets To Avoid Dialysis

Eating A Pre-Dialysis Kidney Diet-Calories, Carbohydrates, Protein & Fat: Secrets To Avoid Dialysis (Renal Diet HQ IQ-Pre Dialysis Living) (Volume 1)

secrets to avoid dialysis

As I searched for renal diabetic books to review I came across this first book in a series by Mathea Ford RD/LD!

I read this book as it relates to the sub title of Secrets to Avoid Dialysis. It appeared from the outset that this author was very qualified to right about and educate on pre-dialysis kidney disease and renal diabetes.  This book really drills down on four different areas of renal predialysis intake and I can see why she writes on secrets to avoid dialysis.

After a brief overview of kidney predialysis disease, Mathea gets into the keys to a predialysis kidney diet and what components should be considered important.  I really liked the section on reading nutrition labels as not very many people really understand that the serving size varies thus the amounts that you take in.  As she continues to write about secrets to avoid dialysis, I found the section on calorie intake very important.  As there are kidney disease patients who need to loose weight and there are others who are trying to gain weight and this chapter deals with those two persons.

Secrets to Avoid Dialysis

As she gets into the macro nutrients of carbs, proteins and fat, I found that some of her findings and statements are really secrets to avoid dialysis.  Each of these chapters has great points that not only kidney patients should know but we all should know and pay attention to.

The chapter on fluids and fluid intake is one of the most ignored when persons learn they need a predialysis kidney diet and find they need a secret to avoid dialysis.

If you should have both kidney disease and diabetes, the final chapter is going to be of interest to you as the author discusses how these macro nutrients affects the combination of both conditions.

As you search for secrets to avoid dialysis, I think you should consider this book by Mathea Ford and consider following the series Renal Diet HQ IQ-Predialysis Living as she tells me there will be a total of 12 in this series  once completed.  A link to her book on Amazon is here.

Review of Renal Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

Review of Renal Diabetic Diet Meal Planner

Renal_Diabetic_Meal_Plans_Menus_MoreIn searching for my latest review of a renal diet solution, I located the site of Renal Diet HQ and noticed that they offered a renal diabetic diet meal plan as a membership option.  So, in looking at a product to review I thought it would be nice to take an in-depth look at one of the only renal diabetic diet meal plans on the market to see what it offered and see if it stacks up to what I think any meal plan solution should.

First, let’s discuss what I  think any good meal planning or diet solution should offer.  At a minimum it should offer an overall plan that is priced based on the options and benefits is offers and it should be offered with some customer support if you should run into a problem with the download or receiving the information that you ordered.

Now, let’s discuss what this renal diabetic meal plan from Renal Diet HQ offers in its sales pitch.  This plan says that it is curated by a registered dietitian in the USA with experience in renal and diabetic patients.  This is a good start. It also says that it has the following with the plan: Meal patterns for breakfast, lunch and dinner, a snack list and recipes and grocery lists for dinner meals with every day being a new one.  Wow, that is a lot of information and a lot of new recipes over the course of a month or year.  The price for this monthly membership service is about $20 per month.  So, I wanted to try this out for myself to see what the download looked like and if the plan has all that.  I filled out the registration form and submitted my payment and I surprised to find all the files as promised and a few others like a renal diet potassium list and a phosphorus list as well.  These were nice added touches to the monthly plan.  On the first week I received two weeks of plans and each following week I received the dinner meals and grocery lists for that said week.  Each recipe has all the nutritionals needed for a renal diabetic diet.  Some have more carbs than others and some have more potassium and protein than others but the good thing is that you can pick and choose which meals fit your restrictions.  Some folks have higher sodium restrictions than others and some do not.  It makes it were you know what you are doing and can tailor it to your needs.  Also, the variety seems to follow a beef, chicken, turkey, fish and vegetarian meal every week.  Lot’s of choices.  The other thing is the meal portions can be used for other meals if you do not have a large family or if you do not eat all the meal.  Save it for lunch the next day or dinner tomorrow. I found almost all the meals I made to be very tasty and I am pretty picky.

4.1.1I found that the base limitations for the renal diabetic plan from Renal Diet HQ does appear to be with in the standards for nationally recognized limits in the US.  As with all dieting and medical concerns your limits may vary a bit from these standards based on your doctors orders.  Please always consult with your physician as to what you are doing and decisions you make.

If you have diabetes and pre-dialysis kidney disease then this plan might be right for you.  I think that the price is correct for all the information I have gotten and I have not located a more comprehensive plan as of yet.  Oh, also, this is plan is done by Mathea Ford RD/LD and she does offer a one time 8 week plan that is not a monthly membership.  So, if you are apprehensive about joining the monthly plan you might try the one time purchase, it is at the time of writing $47.

Find the link here for Renal Diet HQ –Renal Diabetic Diet Meal Planner

Buy Dr. Scholl's Diabetic and Compression Socks Direct!

Renal Diet Reviews-A Synopsis Of A Great Meal Planner!

Renal Diet Reviews

renal diet

Predialysis Diet Meal Plan

This particular post is not about one single product it is more of a list or renal diet review of what a renal diet for predialysis should include.  I have found after reviewing several predialysis diet meal plan that each plan has certain things and attributes that all predialysis patients need to have or avoid.    The only one that completely covers all the areas and gets 5 stars from me is Renal Diet HQ.

Renal Diet

The areas of renal diets that I feel are needed are the following: plan of some sort for the day and week, breakfast, lunch and dinner plans/patterns, meal recipes with side dishes and then some type of grocery list or way to get to a list.  It is considered a bonus to get educational materials and gets and extra star if lists of foods for each diet are also provided.  Each plan I review or try has to able to be printed easy and can not be difficult to read.  Price ranges are from $20 to $125 per month, I found that my 5 star plan is only $19.97 per month probably because they have several hundred thousand members and it keeps the cost down.  The Secrets plan is purchased one time but it is unclear what you really get so many are very hesitant to buy the plan even though it gets 3 stars from me.
When selecting a plan in the United States look for a reputable site and some one in the US who is licensed or has some credentials if some sort that are regulated.  If you find some thing offshore please be very cautious about who you give your information to.

For my 5 star predialysis diet meal plan click through here!

EatSmart Precision Pro – Multifunction Digital Kitchen Scale w/ Extra Large LCD and 11 Lb. Capacity

The EatSmart Precision Pro with Extra Large LCD display is one of the most economical and best selling scales on the market today.  The easy to read display has been found to be much more user friendly than most of it’s competition.  This scale is great for any renal or diabetes patient who is looking for ease of use and just overall all workability.  The scale has Max weight 11lbs and displays ounces/lbs/grams/kgs; Graduation .05 oz / 1 gram.  It also includes Includes FREE EatSmart Calorie Factors guide.  I found this useful only in certain situations and that my recipes were good at giving me my weights and measurements.  I use Renal Diet HQ meal plans for all my meals.    I found it really helpful for all my proteins as most of them are based on weight or on a “deck of cards”.

The EatSmart scale is in the mid $20 range and works well for use every day and seems to be very durable based on the use I have given mine over the last several months.  If you are looking for a scale on a budget and are concerned about being able to read the display then this scale is probably right up your alley.